Backwards Compatible

Backwards Compatible #15 - Donkey Kong Country (Super Nintendo)

July 10, 2024 Dan Kemp/Lou Carnevale Episode 15
Backwards Compatible #15 - Donkey Kong Country (Super Nintendo)
Backwards Compatible
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Backwards Compatible
Backwards Compatible #15 - Donkey Kong Country (Super Nintendo)
Jul 10, 2024 Episode 15
Dan Kemp/Lou Carnevale

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In episode 15 of "Backwards Compatible", Lou is back in the studio with me, as we swing into the jungles of "Donkey Kong Country" on the SNES, released in November of 1994. I first encountered this game as a rental at a friend’s house—the same friend whose "Super Mario World" save file I unfortunately erased (sorry, Dane!).  Revisiting it now, the game stands out for its exceptional level design, arguably among the best for side-scrolling platformers. Its gameplay mechanics, inspired by Mario’s run button and Sonic’s rhythmic precision, showcase the unique platforming challenges that set "Donkey Kong Country" apart.

Developed by the acclaimed studio Rare and published by Nintendo, "Donkey Kong Country" was one of the first major titles to utilize pre-rendered 3D graphics, created on Silicon Graphics workstations. This innovative approach resulted in some of the most detailed and realistic visuals on the SNES. The game also boasted a memorable soundtrack by David Wise, Eveline Fischer, and Robin Beanland, with tracks like "Aquatic Ambience" and "Gang-Plank Galleon" that are still celebrated today. Despite my burning hatred for the minecart levels, the game’s commercial success and critical acclaim are undeniable. It revitalized the Donkey Kong franchise and established Rare as a powerhouse that would go on to create other hits like "Banjo Kazooie" and "Killer Instinct."

As we explore "Donkey Kong Country's" development, graphical breakthroughs, and gameplay, we also reflect on the pop culture milestones of 1994, setting the scene for when this groundbreaking game first captivated players around the world. Join Lou and me as we delve into the legacy of a game that not only defined an era but also continues to influence the platforming genre across gaming generations.

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Show Notes

Text us and say hello!

In episode 15 of "Backwards Compatible", Lou is back in the studio with me, as we swing into the jungles of "Donkey Kong Country" on the SNES, released in November of 1994. I first encountered this game as a rental at a friend’s house—the same friend whose "Super Mario World" save file I unfortunately erased (sorry, Dane!).  Revisiting it now, the game stands out for its exceptional level design, arguably among the best for side-scrolling platformers. Its gameplay mechanics, inspired by Mario’s run button and Sonic’s rhythmic precision, showcase the unique platforming challenges that set "Donkey Kong Country" apart.

Developed by the acclaimed studio Rare and published by Nintendo, "Donkey Kong Country" was one of the first major titles to utilize pre-rendered 3D graphics, created on Silicon Graphics workstations. This innovative approach resulted in some of the most detailed and realistic visuals on the SNES. The game also boasted a memorable soundtrack by David Wise, Eveline Fischer, and Robin Beanland, with tracks like "Aquatic Ambience" and "Gang-Plank Galleon" that are still celebrated today. Despite my burning hatred for the minecart levels, the game’s commercial success and critical acclaim are undeniable. It revitalized the Donkey Kong franchise and established Rare as a powerhouse that would go on to create other hits like "Banjo Kazooie" and "Killer Instinct."

As we explore "Donkey Kong Country's" development, graphical breakthroughs, and gameplay, we also reflect on the pop culture milestones of 1994, setting the scene for when this groundbreaking game first captivated players around the world. Join Lou and me as we delve into the legacy of a game that not only defined an era but also continues to influence the platforming genre across gaming generations.

Support the Show.

We've got merch!

Check out the site for some awesome Gen 'S' swag :)